RAF Fiskerton. HOME PAGE.
RAF Fiskerton HOME PAGE

About this site.

Location and Layout.

Timeline and the airfield today

Squadrons at Fiskerton,1943 to 45.

The Avro Lancaster

Bomber Command Form 10/ Lancaster Pilots Notes

A Typical Raid.

Images Page1, Main airfield.

Images Page 2, Main Airfield.

Images page 3, Main airfield.

Image Page Dispersed sites,

Wartime Images, page 1

Wartime images, page 2

Wartime Images,page 3.

Wartime Images page 4

Misc. images.Page 1.

Misc images, Page 2

Misc Images Page 3

576 Sqn Lancaster PD 309 recovery

150 Squadron R.A.F.

GROUP CAPTAIN TERENCE JOHN ARBUTHNOT

576 Sqn Wing/Cmdr Basil Arthur Templeman-Rooke

576 Sqn Flt/Lt Leslie Brown

576 Sqn. Flt/Sgt Eddie Wise

49 sqn Flt/Lt Charles Dunnet

49 Sqn Fred Cooper.

576 Sqn F/O William Carland Johnston

49 Sqn Flt/Lt Victor Medway Arnold

576 Sqn Flt/Lt Charles Roach

 49 Sqn Sgt. E.B.(Ted) Cachart.

49 Sqn Sgt Douglas D.R. Dalaway

576 Sqn Flt/Lt Bertram W. Roberts

576 Sqn Flt/Sgt Johnny Musgrave

576 Sqn Flying Officer Edward L Saslove

49 Sqn Pilot Officer Edgar R. G. Haines D.F.M.

576 Sqn Flt/Lt Herbert Benson

576 Sqn Flying Officer Frank Wilson

576 Sqn Flt/Sgt Dennis Ovenden

576 Sqn Flt/Sgt Danny Ranchuk

576 Sqn Flt/Sgt Ken Tamkin.

49 Sqn Flying Officer Alexander V Bone

576 Sqn Sgt Stanley Lloyd

576 Sqn Warrant Officer Frederick Taylor, DFM

576 Sqn Warrant Officer Reg Croot

49 Sqn. S/L J.E Raw-Rees D.F.C.

576 Sqn Sgt Alfred Thorpe Turton

 576 Sqn Warrant Officer Eugene Patrick (Jimmy) Collins

576 Sqn. F/O R Bastic & Crew

576 Sqn. Sgt. George Lynn.

576 Sqn Airman Ron Kent

576 Sqn. Sgt. D.Girling.

576 Sqn F/O A.J.L Ridge

576 Sqn F/O Archibald de Largy Greig

Contact & links to similar sites, page 1

 Links to similar sites, page 2.

MEMORIAL PAGE

A website about an old Bomber Command airfield in Lincolnshire.

 

 


During the second world war, RAF Lancasters flew from this airfield on operations. With their crews of seven, one-hundred and seventeen of these Lancasters would never return.

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Night after night in the cold black hostile skies above enemy-occupied Europe, a deadly war was waged between enemy forces on the ground, roving enemy night-fighter aircraft  and our allied bomber crews. Using complex state-of-the-art electronic counter-measures and human vigilance, remaining undetected was vital. Detection was almost always fatal and often, the first the bomber crews would know of their detection was the sudden burst of gunfire which would rip their bomber apart.Equally deadly, were the  searchlights on the ground. These  could trap an aircraft in their beams-illuminating them for the flak guns or the night-fighters.

During the bombing campaign of the Second World War, the duties that the crews of Bomber Command were expected to undertake was considered so dangerous, even by wartime standards,that the bomber crews were made up entirely of volunteers. Each man was obliged to complete a thirty- mission tour of operations. The life expectancy of a crew was just five operations. Given that aircrew training took two-years to complete and given that the crews were operating the most  sophisticated and reliable tool of war  devised to date-namely the Lancaster bomber, highlights just how hazardous and difficult bombing operations were.The eventual loss calculations, which consisted of operational and training losses, serious physical and mental injury was finally calculated at 75% of every 100 who flew with Bomber Command in the war years 1939 to 1945.


This airfield was the wartime home of:

49 Squadron RAF

576 Squadron RAF

150 Squadron RAF


All the images and information on this website are the interllectual property of Martin Nichols and David Briggs, Anyone wishing to copy material from this website must contact the webmasters for permission via the e-mail links below. July 2006.

Much of the  information on this website has been taken from eye witness accounts and records which were made over sixty-five years ago. Inevitably, errors do occur. Would anyone who finds any inaccuracies in the information on this website,  please contact the joint webmasters via the e-mail links on this page and the errors will be rectified immediately.

Anyone visiting this website  who has information/photographs of the airfield, either wartime or post-war or former veterans who were stationed at Fiskerton and who would like to add this information or photographs to the site, please contact the webmasters at either:  mn77@hotmail.co.uk  (Martin Nichols) or: fiskerton202"at"hotmail.co.uk (David Briggs)Credit to the sender will be given if desired.Information/photographs can either be posted or sent via e-mail. Posted material will be returned immediately upon scanning. 

 

 

JANUARY 2014. A NEW  WEBSITE HAS  BEEN CREATED USING  ORIGINAL MATERIAL FROM THIS WEBSITE PLUS ADDITIONAL NEW MATERIAL. THE NEW WEBSITE HAS BEEN CREATED BY DAVID BRIGGS AND WILL BE COMPLETED DURING 2014. ANYONE WISHING TO PLACE MATERIAL ON THIS NEW WEBSITE PLEASE CONTACT DAVID ON THE ABOVE E-MAIL ADDRESS.

THE NEW WEBSITE CAN BE FOUND AT www.raffiskertonairfield.co.uk

ADOBE FLASH PLAYER WILL BE NEEDED TO VIEW SOME OF THE FILES ON THE NEW SITE. IF NEEDED,A LINK IS PROVIDED TO DOWNLOAD A FREE VERSION OF ADOBE.